The Quileute Nation is located in La Push, Washington, on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. The Quileute Tribe has lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years. Although the village of La Push is only about one-square mile, the tribe’s original territory stretched along the shores of the Pacific from the glaciers of Mount Olympus to the rivers of rain forests. Much has changed since those times, but Quileute Elders remember “back in the days” When the “old people” dared challenge kwalla, the mighty whale, and recounted the story of how the bayak or raven placed the sun in the sky.

Because of the remote location of La Push, the Quileute have built a tourism industry that serves those seeking a relaxing getaway or a rejuvenating adventure. The tribe’s Oceanside Resort along First Beach offers ocean-view accommodations ranging from luxurious to rustic. Those who visit La Push come for whale watching in the spring; surfing, fishing, and hiking in the summer; and storm watching in the fall and winter.

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​  Our Cities & Communities| Tribal Nations

The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is a sovereign, federally-recognized Indian Nation, with its own constitution and government. Not only does the Tribe govern itself, but many Tribal administrative departments oversee the everyday function of the reservation and provide for Tribal members.


​The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe resides in the Lower Elwha River Valley and adjacent bluffs on the north coast of the Olympic Peninsula just west of Port Angeles, Washington. As recognized by the United States in 1855 Treaty of Point No Point, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe has lived in this area since time immemorial. The Tribe's current landbase was initially acquired by the United States in trust for the Tribe in 1935-36 and these lands were proclaimed as the Lower Elwha Reservation in 1968. Today tribal lands include about a thousand acres of land on and near the Elwha River.

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe

The S'Klallam People since time immemorial  have lived and prospered on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Known as 'the Strong People' the S'Klallams created a rich culture of art, spirituality, traditional knowledge and self-reliance that continues today. 

Since 1988,

The Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe has been involved in a national Self-Governance Demonstration Project which allows the Tribe more autonomy and control over Bureau of Indian Affairs funding. The Project has resulted in the Tribe being able to provide more Tribally-specific programs, services, and activities to better meet the needs of the membership and helps to maintain the government-to-government relation between the Tribe and the United States.

Economic Development Corporation

​​​CLALLAM COUNTY 

The Makah Indian Nation has called the spectacular Neah Bay, Washington area home since time immemorial. The name Makah was attributed to the Tribe by the neighboring tribes, meaning “people generous with food” in the Salish language. The meaning still applies today, as we invite you to visit our community to enjoy the natural beauty and learn about our culture and history.


In the 70’s, our southernmost village was discovered and artifacts from our ancestors from 300 to 500 years ago were recovered. Approximately 1% of the artifacts are on display at our nationally renowned Museum at the Makah Cultural and Research Center.

After a tour of the museum, enjoy the beaches, the rainforest or the ocean by surfing, hiking or fishing. We invite you to stay with us in a variety of accommodations we host here on the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, Washington on the most northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula.